Plant: After last frost

Cucumis sativus and C. melo

50 seeds/pack | 60 days | Heirloom

Mix of Lemon, Mid-East Prolific and Armenian cucumbers. These are our three favorite cucumbers all in one packet. You could direct sow the whole pack along a trellis or in a bed for a bountiful and diverse crop of eaters, slicers and pickle material.

$2.75

Plant: Early Spring or Fall

Lactuca sativa

200 seeds/pack

For those who want several lettuce varieties, try our mix of three colorful cut-and-come-again lettuce. The varieties in this mix change regularly.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Cucumis melo

25 seeds/pack    |   85-100 days   |   Heirloom

Mix of three delicious and different melons: Bidwell Casaba, Crane Melon and Blenheim Muskmelon. All three have orange flesh and are heirloom varieties. Direct seed or transplant after last frost for variety in your garden this summer.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

25 seeds/pack

Mix of Lebanese, Golden Bush Scallop and Yellow Crookneck. All your summer squash varieties in one packet! Direct sow seeds after last frost when soil has warmed. Harvest frequently from plants when fruits are young.

 

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

Helianthus annus

50 seeds/pack

Decorate your garden with sunshine. This mix of sunflowers includes Russian Mammoth, Hungarian Black and Evening Sun. Let these reseed year after year in your garden. The birds will love you for it! Sow sunflowers up to 1/2 inch deep after all danger of frost has passed. Space 2 ft apart or more for optimum growth.

$2.75

Plant: After last frost

25 seeds/pack

Winter squash is an awesome nutritious food source. This combo contains three of our favorites: Oregon Homestead Sweetmeat, Guatemalan Blue Banana and Sugarloaf Delicata. All three of these squashes like to ramble so give them some space. They all have sweet orange flesh great for baking, souping, grilling, baking, etc. Direct seed your squash after all danger of frost has passed and the soil has warmed. Space them 18 inches to 2 feet. Harvest these squashes in the fall when the rind is so hard you can't dig a finger nail into it. Be sure to cut the stems a couple inches away from the squash for better storage. Store fruits is a cool location.

 

$2.75